Tomatos That I Grow

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Gardeners Delght seedlngs sown on the 23-02-18 seed bought from Wilkos

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Image of the aluminium greenhouse where I grow my tomato’s the greenhouse is very old and I have been using it for about fifteen years

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I was preparing the tomato’s for the coming season and you can see I have got about half of the greenhouse planted out the seedling are in the background amongst the chaos I have created

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The tomato’s in this image have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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Notice the grape vine growing on the right hand side

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Close up of the tomato’s which have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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The tomato variety shown in this image are my favourite Gardeners Delight which to grow very well and are not suspetable to many growing problems or diseases

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The tomatos look happy enough and seem to be growing well in their grow pots I always use grow bags as the base component for gowing them in

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Notice the grape vine which is a strawbery tasting type in the back ground its looking really healthy and the main thing it tastes great and there are no pips

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It normally takes about a week to get all the tomato plants into their grow pots and the other containers I use

The Blue Bell Hendon

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Notice the new houses on the right of the Blue Bell these where built in the 1970s and are privately owned

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The roof of The Blue Bell was once a beautiful tiled structure but over many years of neglect sadly it is now nothing like it was in its hey day notice the attic window and the chimney pots and the TV mast

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The Blue Bell was situated in Zion Street Hendon Sunderland which was a street in the Jewish quarter of Hendon

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The Blue Bell looks very sad in its derelict condition and was pulled down shortly after I took these images

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My white Berlingo van can be seen on the left of the image

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Holy Trinity church can be seen in the background the church was opened in 1719 for the growing population of Sunderland as the ship building industry grew

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The attic window of The Blue Bell I wonder what history it can tell us about the pub

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Close up of the Blue Bells attic window now sadly looking very delapitdated after the pub closed shortly after the Blue Bell was pulled down and made into a car park

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Notice the broken windows the drain pipes and the Sky antenna on the wall

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Close up of the broken windows and the drain pipes and the size of the bricks these were the old style a lot smaller than the ones used for building these days

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This was the main door of The Blue Bell the windows are now sadly boarded up with chip board

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Grass and weeds are now growing freely around The Blue Bells main door and on the pavement

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The licence sign of The Blue Bell sadly now looking rather tired and old

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The front of The Blue Bell you can see Holy Trinity Church clock tower on the right of the image

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Notice the broken windows and the curtains hanging out they look vey old

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There is even an original Sky mast next to the drain pipe

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Me and my father Billy Bell often had a drink in The Blue Bell on an afternoon

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The windows of the attic and the first floor are all broken now and the pub now looks a shadow of its former self

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The Zion Street sign looks tattered and weary now is as if to say I have had enough

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In this image you can see nearly all of the boarded up front of The Blue Bell

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The chimney and the attic window can be seen clearly in this image and notice the seagull perched on the attic window

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This image shows The Blue Bells rear extension in Moor Street not quite sure what the function of the extension was but it has been suggested that it could have been the pubs kitchen

Asparagus That I Grow

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This image is of an asparagus plantlet called Sweet Purple I purchased about a dozen of these plantlets of a guy called Keith Wheeler in May 2018
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The roots of the asparagus plantlets can be seen just before I repotted them into larger plant pots

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I use different size pots when transplanting the asparagus seedlings and always mix perlite with the compost I use for transplanting the asparagus

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These images of are of asparagus UC 157 F2 the one of the most popular varieties grown in the world and was developed in the early eighties

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A view of the asparagus plantlets ferns they are looking very healthy and green all these plantlets were grown from seed in my unheated conservatory

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More images of the asparagus plantlets after they had been repotted by me in the conservatory on the allotment

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Image of the ferns of asparagus Sweet Purple planlets which are about seven months old I grew the plantlets from seed in my unheated conservatory

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Wednesday, 20 November 2019
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Gray Road Hendon

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This image is of the front room of 33 Gray Road in the image you can see a photograph of my late mam and dad celebrating their wedding anniversary also an image of my oldest daughter Lisa

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The fire side in the front room of 33 Gray Road when we were children this was a coal fire but in my mam and dads later life was replaced by an electric fire

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The famous green phone which all of my family hated but my dad loved

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The bay window was a typical type used in the mid seventies on property in Hendon and Sunderland

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Billy Bell my father better known as Hendons historian because of his slide shows and his knowledge of Hendon and Sunderlands history

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David Bell outside 33 Gray Road visiting his father Billy Bell at 33 Gray Road this was just after my Mam had died

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Notice my Berlingo van parked on Gray Road the new buildings on the left was once an old vicarage

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These houses were buitl in the late eighties and were typical of the houses built in Hendon and Sunderland at that time they where well built and looked good

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Image show the repairing of the gable end of the house after wind damage on a house in Gray Road Hendon

The Sportsmans Arms

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The Sportsman’s Arms now Known as the Scullery

The Sportsman’s Arms closed on the 05-02-2010 when it closed it was left empty for a few years until a plumbing business opened up a showroom and office in the premises the company owners decided as they were not using all of the building so decided to rent out the old lounge at the rear of the pub

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The Sportsmans Arms Silksworth was once one of the most important buildings in Silksworth

Images taken by Dave Bell

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I took these images from the bottom of High Newport Allotments in May 2010 when the Sportsman’s Arms sadly closed and ended one of the last places that was used and built for the miners and their families of Silksworth very little remains of the miners heritage in Silksworth nowadays

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The once proud sign of the Sportsman’s Arms now looks tired and weary

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Notice the boarded up windows and The Sportsmans Arms sign still swinging as if everything was ok image taken on a wet and windy very cold day

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Close up of the sign on the rear wall of The Sportsmans Arms which closed in May 2010 because of lost revenue caused by very few local people using the public house

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The Sportsmans Arms puplic house built for the miners of Silksworth in 1871 as Silksworth Colliery grew new houses were built for the miners and their families and not forgetting why The Sportsmans Arms built for the miners when they had finished their shifts and to socialise when not working

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Silksworth Colliery shaft was sunk in 1869 In 1871, according to the Census there were approx 800 people living in the Silksworth and Tunstall areas, the local area was mainly farmland and where most people worked on the land.

Scallions and Spring Onions

The words scallion and shallot are related and can be traced back to the Greek ασκολόνιον ('askolonion') as described by the Greek writer Theophrastus. This name, in turn, seems to originate from the name of the ancient Canaan city of Ashkelon. The plant itself came from farther east of Europe.[4]

Types

A germinating scallion, 10 days old

Species and cultivars that may be called "scallions" include:

  • A. cepa
    • 'White Lisbon'
    • 'White Lisbon Winter Hardy' – an extra-hardy variety for overwintering
    • Calçot
    • A. cepa var. cepa – Most of the cultivars grown in the West primarily as scallions belong to this variety.[5] However, the "scallions" from A. cepa var. cepa (common onion) are from a young plant, harvested before a bulb forms or sometimes after slight bulbing has occurred.
    • A. cepa var. aggregatum (formerly A. ascalonicum) – commonly called shallots or sometimes eschalot.
  • A. chinense
  • A. fistulosum, the Welsh onion – does not form bulbs even when mature, and is grown in the West almost exclusively as a scallion or salad onion, although in Asia this species is of primary importance and used both fresh and cooked.[6]
  • A. × proliferum – sometimes used as scallions[7]

Uses

A close-up view of spring onions (note larger bulb)
Chopped scallions

Spring onions may be cooked or used raw as a part of salads, salsas or Asian recipes. Diced scallions are used in soup, noodle and seafood dishes, sandwiches, curries and as part of a stir fry. In many Eastern sauces, the bottom half-centimetre (quarter-inch) of the root is commonly removed before use.

In Mexico and the Southwest United States, cebollitas are scallions that are sprinkled with salt, grilled whole and eaten with cheese and rice. Topped with lime juice, they are typically served as a traditional accompaniment to asado dishes.[8][9]

In Catalan cuisine, calçot is a type of onion traditionally eaten in a calçotada (plural: calçotades). A popular gastronomic event of the same name is held between the end of winter and early spring, where calçots are grilled, dipped in salvitxada or romesco sauce, and consumed in massive quantities.[10][11]

In Japan, tree onions (wakegi) are used mostly as topping of Japanese cuisine such like tofu.

In Vietnam, Welsh onion is important to prepare dưa hành (fermented onions) which is served for Tết, the Vietnamese New Year. A kind of sauce, mỡ hành (Welsh onion fried in oil), is used in dishes such as cơm tấm, bánh ít and cà tím nướng. Welsh onion is the main ingredient in the dish cháo hành, which is a rice porridge used to treat the common cold.

In India, it is eaten raw as an appetizer. In north India, coriander, mint and onion chutney are made using uncooked scallions. It is also used as a vegetable with Chapatis & Rotis.

In the United Kingdom, scallions are normally chopped and added to mashed potatoes, or as an added ingredient to potato salad.

In the southern Philippines, it is ground in a mortar along with ginger and chili pepper to make a native condiment called wet palapa, which can be used to spice dishes or as a topping for fried or sun-dried food. It can also be used to make the dry version of palapa, when it is stir fried with fresh coconut shavings and wet palapa.

During the Passover meal (Seder), Persian Jews whack each other with scallions before singing the song "Dayenu", symbolizing the whips endured by the Israelites under the ancient Egyptians.[12]

Scallion oil is sometimes made from the green leaves. The leaves are chopped and lightly cooked, then emulsified in oil that is then used as a garnish.

Nutritional value

See Allium fistulosum.

Regional and other names

Green onions are one of the two major crops (along with sweet potatoes) of Liu'ao Peninsula in Fujian.

Scallions have various other common names throughout the world. These names include spring onion, green onion, table onion, salad onion, onion stick, long onion, baby onion, precious onion, yard onion, gibbon, syboe and shallot. Scallion and its many names can be mistakenly used for the young plants of the shallot (A. cepa var. aggregatum, formerly A. ascalonicum), harvested before bulbs form, or sometimes after slight bulbing has occurred.

  • Afghanistan – Known as "shna pyaz" meaning "green onion"
  • Albania – Known as qepë të njoma meaning "young/baby onions"
  • Arabic – Known in the Arabic-speaking countries as بصل أخضر ("green onion")[13]
  • Argentina – Known as cebolla de verdeo and ciboulette
  • Australia – The common names are "spring onions" and "shallots".[14]
  • Bangladesh – In Bangla it is known as পেঁয়াজ পাতা, which means "onion leaf" or "onion leaves".
  • Belgium – In the Dutch speaking part, it is known as "pijpajuin", which means "tubular onion".
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina – Known as "mladi luk".
  • Brazil – Known as cebolinha,[15] which is also the Portuguese word for chives. A more precise term is cebolinha-verde which refers specifically to A. fistulosum.[16]
  • Cambodia – Called "ស្លឹកខ្ទឹម"
  • Caribbean – Often referred to as "chives"
  • China – The common name is cōng (葱); xiǎocōng (小葱) is another term for scallion.[17]
  • Colombia – Known as "cebolla larga"
  • Costa Rica – Usually "cebollín"
  • Croatia – "mladi luk", meaning "young onion"
  • Denmark – Known as forårsløg when referring to undeveloped A. pena and pibeløg when referring to A. fistulosum[18]
  • Dominican Republic – Known as "cebollín"
  • Ecuador – Known as "cebolla larga"
  • Estonia – Known as roheline sibul (literally "green onion")
  • Finland – Known as kevätsipuli (literally "spring onion")
  • France – Known as "oignon vert" (literally "green onion"), "ciboule" and "cébette"
  • Germany and Austria – Known as Frühlingszwiebel (among other names), which means "spring onion".[19]
  • Greece – Known as φρέσκο κρεμμυδάκι[20]
  • Hungary – Known as újhagyma (literally "new onion")
  • Iceland – Known as vorlaukur (literally "spring onion")[21]
  • IndiaMay be referred to as "spring onion", and in Hindi-speaking areas as pyaz patti. In the eastern state of West Bengal, spring onions are referred to as "গাছ পিঁয়াজ" ( literally meaning "tree onions"). In Maharashtra, they are referred to as “उळपात” or “कांदा पात” (literally meaning “onion leaves).
  • Indonesia and Malaysia – Known as daun bawang (onion leaf). The same term is used for leeks (daun bawang perai). Chinese chives which can be mistaken for scallions are called daun kucai.[22]
  • Israel – Known as batzal yaroq (בצל ירוק), which means "green onion"
  • Iran – Known as پیازچه.[23]
  • Ireland and Northern Ireland – the term "scallions" is commonly used.[24]
  • Italy – Known as cipolla d'inverno ("winter onion"),[25] cipollotto or cipolletta,[26] which means "little onion", "cipollotti freschi" (fresh little onions), or cipolla verde ("green onion").
  • Jamaica – Known as escallion and refers to Welsh onion.
  • Korea – Known as pa (); larger variety of Allium fistulosum called daepa (대파, "big scallion"), thinner early variety called silpa (실파, "thread scallion"); Allium × proliferum called jjokpa (쪽파).
  • Kyrgyzstan – Known as көк пиаз, which literally translates to "blue onion".
  • Latvia – Known as sīpolloki.
  • Lithuania – Known as laiškinis svogūnas in Lithuania, which means "leafy onion".[27]
  • Netherlands – Known as bos ui, which literally translates as "bundle onion", or lente ui, which translates as "spring onion".[28]
  • New Zealand – The common name is "spring onion".[29]
  • Norway – Known as vårløk (bokmål) or vårlauk (nynorsk), which literally means “spring onion”.
  • Peru – The common name is cebolla china which means "Chinese onion" in Spanish.[30]
  • Philippines – Known as sibuyas na mura.[31] It is also called berdeng sibuyas.[32]
  • Portugal – Known as cebolinho
  • Quebec - Known by Francophones as échalotte, which is also the Standard French word for shallot. To distinguish the two, Franco-Québécois call the true shallot échalotte française. The Quebec English word for scallion is also "shallot", a calque of the Quebec French word; it is pronounced with the stress on the last syllable, as in échalotte.
  • Romania – Known as ceapă verde, which means "green onion"[33]
  • Russia – Known as зеленый лук, which means "green onion"[34]
  • Scotland – known as "spring onion", and also in Scots as cibies[24] or sibies, from the French syboe.
  • Serbia – Known as mladi luk, which means "young onion"[35][36]
  • Slovakia – Known as 'cíbiky', which is an irregular diminutive of "onions" (pl.) or simply 'jarná cibula' which means 'spring onion'.
  • Spain – Known as "Cebolleta". In the little city of Valls (Catalonia), there's a local traditional variety of sweety onion named Calçots.
  • Sri Lanka – Known as loonu kola (ලූනු කොළ), which literally means "onion leaves", or in Tamil as (வெங்காயத்தாள்)
  • Sweden – Known as salladslök (in Swedish) ("salad onion") as a general name for onions with not yet fully developed bulbs, and piplök ("pipe onion") when referring to A. fistulosum. The term vårlök ("spring onion") is sometimes also used, but that is a misnomer caused by translating the English "spring onion". Vårlök is the Swedish name for Gagea lutea, which is inedible and not an onion at all.[37]
  • Turkey – Known as taze soğan, meaning "fresh onion"
  • United States – Known as "scallion" or "green onion" except for the New Orleans area where it is known as shallot. The term "green onion" is also used in reference to immature specimens of the ordinary onion (Allium cepa) harvested in the spring. In the region of south Louisiana known as Cajun Country it is most often referred to as "onion tops".
  • United Kingdom and some Commonwealth countries including Singapore the most common name is "spring onion"
  • Vietnam – Known as "hành lá", which means "leaf onion"/"scallion" ("lá" means "leaf"), in order to distinguish with "hành tây" which means "onion"
  • Wales – known as "spring onion" or "jibbon" /ˈɪbən/.[38] Also known in South Wales as sibwn (pronounced "shibun")[39], from the French syboe.

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