Tomatos That I Grow

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Gardeners Delght seedlngs sown on the 23-02-18 seed bought from Wilkos

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Image of the aluminium greenhouse where I grow my tomato’s the greenhouse is very old and I have been using it for about fifteen years

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I was preparing the tomato’s for the coming season and you can see I have got about half of the greenhouse planted out the seedling are in the background amongst the chaos I have created

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The tomato’s in this image have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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Notice the grape vine growing on the right hand side

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Close up of the tomato’s which have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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The tomato variety shown in this image are my favourite Gardeners Delight which to grow very well and are not suspetable to many growing problems or diseases

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The tomatos look happy enough and seem to be growing well in their grow pots I always use grow bags as the base component for gowing them in

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Notice the grape vine which is a strawbery tasting type in the back ground its looking really healthy and the main thing it tastes great and there are no pips

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It normally takes about a week to get all the tomato plants into their grow pots and the other containers I use

The Blue Bell Hendon

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Notice the new houses on the right of the Blue Bell these where built in the 1970s and are privately owned

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The roof of The Blue Bell was once a beautiful tiled structure but over many years of neglect sadly it is now nothing like it was in its hey day notice the attic window and the chimney pots and the TV mast

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The Blue Bell was situated in Zion Street Hendon Sunderland which was a street in the Jewish quarter of Hendon

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The Blue Bell looks very sad in its derelict condition and was pulled down shortly after I took these images

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My white Berlingo van can be seen on the left of the image

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Holy Trinity church can be seen in the background the church was opened in 1719 for the growing population of Sunderland as the ship building industry grew

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The attic window of The Blue Bell I wonder what history it can tell us about the pub

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Close up of the Blue Bells attic window now sadly looking very delapitdated after the pub closed shortly after the Blue Bell was pulled down and made into a car park

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Notice the broken windows the drain pipes and the Sky antenna on the wall

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Close up of the broken windows and the drain pipes and the size of the bricks these were the old style a lot smaller than the ones used for building these days

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This was the main door of The Blue Bell the windows are now sadly boarded up with chip board

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Grass and weeds are now growing freely around The Blue Bells main door and on the pavement

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The licence sign of The Blue Bell sadly now looking rather tired and old

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The front of The Blue Bell you can see Holy Trinity Church clock tower on the right of the image

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Notice the broken windows and the curtains hanging out they look vey old

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There is even an original Sky mast next to the drain pipe

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Me and my father Billy Bell often had a drink in The Blue Bell on an afternoon

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The windows of the attic and the first floor are all broken now and the pub now looks a shadow of its former self

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The Zion Street sign looks tattered and weary now is as if to say I have had enough

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In this image you can see nearly all of the boarded up front of The Blue Bell

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The chimney and the attic window can be seen clearly in this image and notice the seagull perched on the attic window

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This image shows The Blue Bells rear extension in Moor Street not quite sure what the function of the extension was but it has been suggested that it could have been the pubs kitchen

Asparagus That I Grow

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This image is of an asparagus plantlet called Sweet Purple I purchased about a dozen of these plantlets of a guy called Keith Wheeler in May 2018
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The roots of the asparagus plantlets can be seen just before I repotted them into larger plant pots

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I use different size pots when transplanting the asparagus seedlings and always mix perlite with the compost I use for transplanting the asparagus

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These images of are of asparagus UC 157 F2 the one of the most popular varieties grown in the world and was developed in the early eighties

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A view of the asparagus plantlets ferns they are looking very healthy and green all these plantlets were grown from seed in my unheated conservatory

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More images of the asparagus plantlets after they had been repotted by me in the conservatory on the allotment

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Image of the ferns of asparagus Sweet Purple planlets which are about seven months old I grew the plantlets from seed in my unheated conservatory

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Saturday, 06 March 2021
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John Street

  • Category: Sunderland
  • Published: Monday, 08 July 2019 21:30
  • Written by Dave Bell
  • Hits: 634

Today John Street can be described as a street of two halves. To the north of St Thomas Street the block is dominated by Joplings department store. Go south and it is as if you are crossing a boundary. The south end of the street is far more business-like with the former grand houses of the middle classes being used primarily as offices.  

 The buildings in the street were erected at various times between 1800 and 1850 and originally housed many important Wearside businessmen and their families. It was part of a group of residential streets that included Fawcett Street Street, Foyle Street and Frederick Street. Fawcett Street was named after John Fawcett, the one-time Recorder of Durham and the other streets after his sons.  

 In its early days, John Street was the epitome of sedate, middle class respectability, a street of crinolines, carriages, maids and menservants which really was cut off from the rowdy dockland area of lower High Street, just a saunter away.   The first invaders of residential John Street were solicitors, some of whose firm names still exist in the street. These houses were bought when the popularity of the east end of the town began to wane. Then a few shops began to spread from the then highly prosperous High Street East into Fawcett Street and gradually into the north end of John Street – the oldest section where the Church of St Thomas and its vicarage stood. 

  It was between the two world wars and after World War II that this once quiet street began to get really busy. As shops were bombed or demolished in the east end they often continued their businesses in John Street. An example of this was the hardware firm of J. Strother & Son which moved into John Street from its bombed-out premises in High Street West. Joplings Department store relocated into the street in May 1956 from its High Street premises which had been completely destroyed by fire in December 1954. 

  Up to the beginning of World War Two, John Street was regarded as one of the finest residential streets in the town. Many of the houses were Georgian, having been built between 1820 and 1830 during the reign of George IV.   In the early part of the twentieth century the wine and spirit merchants, J.W. Cameron & Co Ltd occupied nos 1, 2 and 3 John Street. The rest of this north-east block of the street was taken up by St Thomas’s Church and the verger’s house, both built in 1828.  

 The change in this block came in the 1940s with the destruction of the church on 14th March 1943 by a German bomb. The church was not rebuilt and the site was ripe for any new commercial enterprise to take over. This was to prove a godsend to Joplings.Numbers 1, 2 and 3 were eventually taken over by Northern Furnishing Company, a branch of Hardy Furnishing which remained there throughout the 1970s and 80s when the movement west of the commercial centre of the town away from this area brought closure to this branch of the firm.   Until 1958 the west side of this block still retained one of its original Georgian properties, 66 John Street. It was demolished that year to make way for the extension to Woolworths. The pillared entrance to the building, which began its existence in 1827 was retained and installed in a doorway at the south end of the street and can still be seen today.  

 The hardware firm of Strothers relocated to the north west block after their large shop in High Street West was destroyed in World War Two. On the corner of this block also stood the shop of J. Risdon & So, owned by Norman Risdon, these premises having been rebuilt following the Havelock House Fire of 1898. Risdons sold just about everything for babies from shawls to top quality prams. It served Wearsiders right up to 1977 before closing. Today the premises are occupied by bookmakers.  The remaining Georgian buildings in the two other blocks of John Street are now occupied by offices although with the arrival of the twenty first century one of two have had a change of use to become shops or coffee shops.  

 The south block once boasted two magnificent buildings at either end: Sunderland & South Shields Water Company on the corner of Borough Road and the Constitutional Club on the corner of Athenaeum Street. The Water Company property has now been renovated and become an aparthotel, known today as Hawksley House. The Constitutional Club closed in 1941 and was demolished and replaced by an office block (today occupied by McKenzies, solicitors) Nos 43 and 44 John Street were demolished and a County Court built there in 1876.   

 The west corner of the south block was, in the early twentieth century, occupied by the YMCA before becoming a restaurant. It was eventually purchased by H. Binns in 1929 and then demolished and rebuilt as an extension of their store.

 Today Wearside shoppers still visit the street and Joplings store, now owned by Owen Owen, still serves the city although plans are afoot to change the top floor of the building into a hotel.

  Woolworth's extension of 1958 had brought extra life to John Street but the downsizing of the store in the 1990s saw the extension close. This, together with the relocation of Strothers to Brumwell's premises in High Street West and the closure of Northern Furnishing and Risdons in the mid 1970s left Joplings as the dominant commercial outlet of the street. Joplings is now owned by the company and plans are being prepared to change the top floor of this store into a hotel.  

   

Cameron's building on the north east corner of John St. The building has been altered but the top floor is still recognizable today 

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