Tomatos That I Grow

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Gardeners Delght seedlngs sown on the 23-02-18 seed bought from Wilkos

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Image of the aluminium greenhouse where I grow my tomato’s the greenhouse is very old and I have been using it for about fifteen years

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I was preparing the tomato’s for the coming season and you can see I have got about half of the greenhouse planted out the seedling are in the background amongst the chaos I have created

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The tomato’s in this image have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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Notice the grape vine growing on the right hand side

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Close up of the tomato’s which have been planted in their grow pots for about two weeks

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The tomato variety shown in this image are my favourite Gardeners Delight which to grow very well and are not suspetable to many growing problems or diseases

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The tomatos look happy enough and seem to be growing well in their grow pots I always use grow bags as the base component for gowing them in

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Notice the grape vine which is a strawbery tasting type in the back ground its looking really healthy and the main thing it tastes great and there are no pips

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It normally takes about a week to get all the tomato plants into their grow pots and the other containers I use

The Blue Bell Hendon

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Notice the new houses on the right of the Blue Bell these where built in the 1970s and are privately owned

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The roof of The Blue Bell was once a beautiful tiled structure but over many years of neglect sadly it is now nothing like it was in its hey day notice the attic window and the chimney pots and the TV mast

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The Blue Bell was situated in Zion Street Hendon Sunderland which was a street in the Jewish quarter of Hendon

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The Blue Bell looks very sad in its derelict condition and was pulled down shortly after I took these images

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My white Berlingo van can be seen on the left of the image

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Holy Trinity church can be seen in the background the church was opened in 1719 for the growing population of Sunderland as the ship building industry grew

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The attic window of The Blue Bell I wonder what history it can tell us about the pub

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Close up of the Blue Bells attic window now sadly looking very delapitdated after the pub closed shortly after the Blue Bell was pulled down and made into a car park

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Notice the broken windows the drain pipes and the Sky antenna on the wall

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Close up of the broken windows and the drain pipes and the size of the bricks these were the old style a lot smaller than the ones used for building these days

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This was the main door of The Blue Bell the windows are now sadly boarded up with chip board

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Grass and weeds are now growing freely around The Blue Bells main door and on the pavement

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The licence sign of The Blue Bell sadly now looking rather tired and old

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The front of The Blue Bell you can see Holy Trinity Church clock tower on the right of the image

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Notice the broken windows and the curtains hanging out they look vey old

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There is even an original Sky mast next to the drain pipe

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Me and my father Billy Bell often had a drink in The Blue Bell on an afternoon

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The windows of the attic and the first floor are all broken now and the pub now looks a shadow of its former self

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The Zion Street sign looks tattered and weary now is as if to say I have had enough

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In this image you can see nearly all of the boarded up front of The Blue Bell

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The chimney and the attic window can be seen clearly in this image and notice the seagull perched on the attic window

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This image shows The Blue Bells rear extension in Moor Street not quite sure what the function of the extension was but it has been suggested that it could have been the pubs kitchen

Asparagus That I Grow

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This image is of an asparagus plantlet called Sweet Purple I purchased about a dozen of these plantlets of a guy called Keith Wheeler in May 2018
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The roots of the asparagus plantlets can be seen just before I repotted them into larger plant pots

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I use different size pots when transplanting the asparagus seedlings and always mix perlite with the compost I use for transplanting the asparagus

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These images of are of asparagus UC 157 F2 the one of the most popular varieties grown in the world and was developed in the early eighties

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A view of the asparagus plantlets ferns they are looking very healthy and green all these plantlets were grown from seed in my unheated conservatory

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More images of the asparagus plantlets after they had been repotted by me in the conservatory on the allotment

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Image of the ferns of asparagus Sweet Purple planlets which are about seven months old I grew the plantlets from seed in my unheated conservatory

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Monday, 19 August 2019
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Gray Road Hendon

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This image is of the front room of 33 Gray Road in the image you can see a photograph of my late mam and dad celebrating their wedding anniversary also an image of my oldest daughter Lisa

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The fire side in the front room of 33 Gray Road when we were children this was a coal fire but in my mam and dads later life was replaced by an electric fire

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The famous green phone which all of my family hated but my dad loved

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The bay window was a typical type used in the mid seventies on property in Hendon and Sunderland

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Billy Bell my father better known as Hendons historian because of his slide shows and his knowledge of Hendon and Sunderlands history

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David Bell outside 33 Gray Road visiting his father Billy Bell at 33 Gray Road this was just after my Mam had died

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Notice my Berlingo van parked on Gray Road the new buildings on the left was once an old vicarage

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These houses were buitl in the late eighties and were typical of the houses built in Hendon and Sunderland at that time they where well built and looked good

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Image show the repairing of the gable end of the house after wind damage on a house in Gray Road Hendon

The Sportsmans Arms

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The Sportsman’s Arms now Known as the Scullery

The Sportsman’s Arms closed on the 05-02-2010 when it closed it was left empty for a few years until a plumbing business opened up a showroom and office in the premises the company owners decided as they were not using all of the building so decided to rent out the old lounge at the rear of the pub

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The Sportsmans Arms Silksworth was once one of the most important buildings in Silksworth

Images taken by Dave Bell

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I took these images from the bottom of High Newport Allotments in May 2010 when the Sportsman’s Arms sadly closed and ended one of the last places that was used and built for the miners and their families of Silksworth very little remains of the miners heritage in Silksworth nowadays

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The once proud sign of the Sportsman’s Arms now looks tired and weary

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Notice the boarded up windows and The Sportsmans Arms sign still swinging as if everything was ok image taken on a wet and windy very cold day

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Close up of the sign on the rear wall of The Sportsmans Arms which closed in May 2010 because of lost revenue caused by very few local people using the public house

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The Sportsmans Arms puplic house built for the miners of Silksworth in 1871 as Silksworth Colliery grew new houses were built for the miners and their families and not forgetting why The Sportsmans Arms built for the miners when they had finished their shifts and to socialise when not working

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Silksworth Colliery shaft was sunk in 1869 In 1871, according to the Census there were approx 800 people living in the Silksworth and Tunstall areas, the local area was mainly farmland and where most people worked on the land.

Paper Mill Hendon

  • Category: Hendon
  • Published: Saturday, 05 January 2019 23:39
  • Written by Administrator
  • Hits: 257

The paper works were open by 1872 producing 200 tons of printing and writing paper per week. 18,000 tons of esparto grass was imported from Spain and North Africa per year. By 1902 the mill had become the largest paper mill in the north of England and had supplemented esparto grasas with wood pulp. Water for the mill was drawn from a well within the works and another in Grangetown. Within the complex of buildings was a reservoir with further reservois were located to the south of the buildings. These were used to control the quality of the copius amounts of water needed for making paper and for power generation. In 1902 and still in 1915 William Aitken was the secretary of the works. He lived at Hendon Grange, a building to the south of the main complex, adjacent to the reservoirs. By 1940 Hendon Grange was used as offices. Hendon Grange was demolished in 2002-3. Numerous alterations were made to the site from 1974 onwards including a new boiler house, steel chimney (1979-1980) and reel store (1999-2000). In 1998 the reservoirs in the south-west corner of the site were filled in and converted to a car park. The paper works ceased production in 2005. The buildings at the northern end of the paper works were still in use in 2010 by the Edward Thompson Group who owned the paper works since 1

 
   
   

 Interesting Article Hendon Paper Works Co Limited



My father, Arthur L. Linfoot (1890-1977), worked at the Hendon Paper Works (HPW) for nearly 50 years: from 1907 or 1908 until his retirement in 1956. He was however on War service from July 1915, when he volunteered for the RAMC (see his daily Diary blog for the years 1914-18, www.arthurlinfoot.org.uk.) until May or June 1919; see the letter (below) dated 16.01.1919 from Mr Sandelands of HPW, regarding his post-War re-employment. My father went to HPW as a clerk, doing shorthand, typing, book-keeping and general duties, as recorded in his Diary; he became Company Secretary in 1931 or thereabouts, and was a Director from 1953 until shortly after the take-over by DomTar.

HPW was as Ms Larmour says founded in 1872; I remember the date and initials HPW in a roundel on the porch floor in the office building, which I believe had originally been the Manager’s house, near the Works entrance in Ocean Road. The factory area extended north from there, perhaps as far as Sea Beach Road, and from Commercial Road on the west towards the low cliffs (where there were piggeries.) The image on the 1907 card was apparently taken from this direction. At their north-east corner, HPW had a heavily-used rail connection from the docks, running through or east of the gas works; there was then very little road freight, either of raw materials or finished products. The two chimneys were indeed a landmark, as Ms Gomersall says; both were originally about 200ft. high, but one was shortened by some 20ft. early in the 20th century.

Up to WW2, HPW produced mainly medium-quality (ie not hand-made) writing-paper, from esparto grass as Ms Larmour says; this came from North Africa, sometimes on vessels chartered by the Company. During and immediately after WW2, however, much of the paper was made from waste paper and straw, which required much more boiling than esparto, and made poor-quality paper. After WW2, HPW became a big producer of duplicating paper (which had become a world-wide peace-time requisite), and used a lot of wood pulp from Scandinavia; HPW also tried producing coated wrapping papers for confectionery etc. – another new need - but this required expensive specialised machinery. Although the illustration on the Sunderland Site is captioned as a ‘printing machine’, it is actually a paper-making machine and I never heard of HPW doing any commercial printing. The work-force is quoted in the cutting about DomTar’s closure as about 400. My recollection, from the 1940s and ‘50s, puts it nearer 200-250, but perhaps it varied.

Paper-mills need a great deal of clean water (the fluid at the ‘wet end’ of a Foudrinière machine was about 2% cellulose fibre and 98% water, and the basic process of paper-making is to get rid of the water and leave a sheet of dried-out fibre of even thickness.) This why the small, older paper-mills, such as Ford and Fourstones, were often sited at river-sides. HPW was near the sea, but sea-water won’t do (desalination was not a practical proposition), so they got their fresh water from a pumping-station adjoining Leechmere Road.

The Company was not totally owned by the Davidson family, though no doubt they had large shareholdings; my father mentioned sending dividends to shareholders on the South Coast and elsewhere, the Directors undoubtedly had shareholdings, and I believe he had a few shares himself. But it was a private company, not quoted on the Stock Exchange, and the Articles did not permit share transactions without the consent of the Board. This probably helped the Company to operate in a financially conservative way, with fixed assets written off comparatively quickly, and without constant pressure to maximise returns on capital. This in turn may have helped in the decision not to close during the Depression in the early 1930s (the Ford Paper Mill, mentioned on the web-page, did of course have to close). My father used to say after WW2 that if the financial institutions had had access to the Company’s balance sheet and other data, there would have been a great scramble from the asset-strippers. The 

takeover by Dominion Tar, which Mr Cyril Smith mentions, was perhaps encouraged by HPW’s financial strength, but DomTar’s main motivation was actually to get access to the European Common Market; the delays in the UK’s accession, due originally to de Gaulle’s opposition, may have influenced DomTar’s eventual withdrawal, though the competition of much larger paper-mills in the UK, and of trees-to-paper mills in Scandinavia, would probably have been decisive anyway.

Regarding the Davidson family: Percy W. Davidson, who was a few months older than my father, came to HPW some time after WW1, from a Tyneside company which then or later merged into ICI. He came as Managing Director; I do not know whether he was also Chairman of the Board initially, but he was certainly Chairman & Managing Director when I knew the firm. The Davidsons lived in a big house (which may have been company-owned) in Grangetown, named ‘Sea View’. Percy’s son Ian was in his early 20s at the outbreak of WW2, and remained in post, effectively as his father’s deputy (I don’t know his exact title) at HPW as part of the war effort. Percy Davidson in the late 1940s wanted me to take over from my father and carry on the firm with his son after our respective fathers’ retirement. This partly explains my knowledge of the Works, but while I took an interest in my father’s work, I did not take up the suggestion.

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